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Issue 28: Grass-fed Beef Recipes

Easy Broiled Steak
Used by permission from The Lazy Person’s Whole Food Cookbook by Stephen Byrnes

Ingredients:
1 sirloin or porterhouse steak (grassfed)
Butter

Directions:
Broil steak under hot flame or hot frying pan, turning frequently, until well browned. Place on serving dish and season as you like. You may add a pat of butter on top of the steak before serving. Serves 1.

Easy Broiled Steak

 

Easy Pepper Steak
Used by permission from The Lazy Person’s Whole Food Cookbook by Stephen Byrnes

Ingredients:
4 equal-sized pieces of steak—sirloin or top round, about 1-inch thick (grassfed)
1 egg, beaten and diluted with a little water
1 red or yellow pepper, seeded and chopped into 4 slices
1 large red onion, chopped into four slices
Olive oil
Sea salt and pepper to taste
Soy sauce

Directions:
Place steak in a large bowl and add the egg. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and let sit for 15 minutes. Match up the onion and pepper slices. In a shallow baking pan, place enough olive oil to cover the bottom. Place the four steaks in the pan and sprinkle a little soy sauce on top of each. Then place one onion and pepper slice on each. Place under the broiler for 3-4 minutes. When you turn the steaks, be sure to replace the pepper and onion slices back on top of the steaks. Cook for another 3-4 minutes. Serves 4.

Easy Pepper Steak

Family Roast Beef
Used by permission from Keith Tindall from White Egret Farm.

Ingredients:
4-5 lb. chuck roast, from grassfed beef
¼ pound butter
½ cup Worcestershire sauce
Celtic sea salt
Black pepper, freshly ground


Directions:
Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Rub the roast with salt and pepper and place in a baking dish with 2-inch sides. In a saucepan, melt the butter and add an equal volume of Worcestershire sauce. Pour the sauce over the roast. Bake slowly at 325 degrees until a meat thermometer reads 150-155 degrees (for medium). Remove the roast from the oven and allow it to rest and redistribute the juices before carving. The temperature will climb to 180 degrees. It is particularly important that grass-fed beef be cooked more slowly at a lower temperature than commercial beef. Grass-fed beef should also be allowed to “coast in” to the desired level of doneness by removing it from the oven several minutes before you think it is done. This preserves the juiciness and produces meat that is more tender. (Note: Worcestershire sauce was originally based on lacto-fermented green English walnut catsup.)

Family Roast Beef

 

This information is intended for educational and informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of an individual consultation or examination or replace the advice of your health care professional and should not be relied upon to determine diagnosis or course of treatment.


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